Could we use “cognitive vaccination” against “Anti-vaxx”?

Drawing on “Inoculation Theory” Baggio and Motterlini argue that cognitive vaccination by “exposure to weak persuasive messages” may be more effective than information campaigns to protect people from “fake news” and “alternative facts”. They suggest that such an approach might have potential in dealing with “anti-vaxx” propaganda … More Could we use “cognitive vaccination” against “Anti-vaxx”?

Should the wise pay the price of Paternalism?

Luc Bovens responds to ~Sarah Conly’s article arguing that almost anything can be a cherished liberty to someone and people’s expectations differ in choice situations. There is a real risk that the wise pay the price for paternalism: Pub closures due to minimum unit alchohol pricing, for example, would hit wise drinkers as well as the unwise. … More Should the wise pay the price of Paternalism?

Understanding Conflicts of Interests: The Vulnerability of Invulnerability and the Danger of Entitlement

Ann Tenbrunsel, responding to Sunita Sah, agrees that “norms” offer a firm platform from which to address professional conflicts of interest. She warns, however, that measures to build advisors sense of “obligation” to clients may generate the same close relationships that have caused major problems in the past. There is a need to understand this “dark side” of potential policies. … More Understanding Conflicts of Interests: The Vulnerability of Invulnerability and the Danger of Entitlement

Puncturing Biases by First Dispelling the Illusion of Invulnerability to Biases

Robert Cialdini, responding to the article by Sunita Sah, argues that steps can be taken to raise advisors’ awareness of their susceptibility to bias, in order to puncture powerful mis-perceptions of invulnerability. … More Puncturing Biases by First Dispelling the Illusion of Invulnerability to Biases